2012 Annual Report/Draft

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Chief Executive report[edit | edit source]

This has been an amazing 12 months for Wikimedia UK and I am so pleased to have played a small part in it. To become your Chief Executive was quite an experience in itself. Although I had been editing pages in a modest way, I really didn't have a sense of how much went on behind the pages—but after five interviews, including a sort of "X factor" visit to the London Wikimeet, all had become clear.

So we now have a base with staff, coffee and—most crucially—space for visitors and volunteers. Our building is accessible 24/7 and we have already held several great volunteer events there, including the OTRS workshop and Wikipedia training events for other charities. We now have a core staff of four—Jon Davies, Chief Executive; Richard Symonds, Office & Development Manager; Daria Cybulska, Events Organiser; and Stevie Benton, Communications Organiser. Each of us is here to help the community and deliver our very ambitious programme of events and activities. I hope all of us will be familiar faces soon and that we can take some of the administrative burden off the shoulders of the volunteers who have done such an amazing job.

This annual report looks back at the achievements of the past 12 months but also forward to what we hope to achieve. Much credit must be given to the trustees and volunteers who made so much happen so fast! 2012 has been a year for volunteers, trustees and staff together. I can't wait to write next year's report.

Evaluation Ting Chen / Jimmy/ Sue Gardner/[edit | edit source]

Dear WMUK board,

Last September you invited me to visit your board meeting in Derby. It was very insightful for me to see on which topics you are working on, how you are working on them, and the interactions inside of your board and between your board and your visitors. Both I and the WMF are very grateful for your invitation, your hospitality and your openness.

We talked about a lot of important issues there. Some of them, like the charity status, you have already achieved inside of the last year. Other topics, like the planning and development of the chapter, is on a good way and progressing. I am especially happy to see that you have successfully got your first employees, which is changing the chapter into a more professionally organized company. Unforgotten for me is the session where you planned for the future, the potential, all the things you can do, the volunteers you can organize. For me it is one of the most impressive sessions I ever attended on a chapter's board meeting, because it reminds me again why we have chapters, why chapters are important for the WMF: they organize volunteers, provide help, gather ideas and do really cool things. And one of the most cool things I ever saw is the QR codes in the meeting venue, the Derby Museum. It is innovative, it is useful and helpful, and it is a really magnificent thing.

For me chapters are brothers and sisters. And the UK chapter is one of the most promising shooting stars of the last year. Disputes among brothers and sisters can be the most painful disputes. We had a lot to dispute in the last year, and we will continue these disputes in this year, and maybe also in the coming years. But nevertheless we are brothers and sisters, we share the same vision, in our deepest belief, we also share the same goal. And this is why we need to keep talking with each other, in good faith to each other's motivation, and try hard to understand each other's points of view.

I want to once again congratulate you for your achievements, and thank you for the wonderful things you did in the past year, and look forward to see what you will do in the coming years.

With love and honest respect Ting Chen

Highlights in the press - Mike Peel and Steve Virgin[edit | edit source]

Our biggest news story this year, by a mile, was the global blackout of the English Wikipedia on 18 January 2012 to protest against the proposed SOPA and PIPA legislation in the United States. The UK media coverage we received was staggering. The BBC, Telegraph, Guardian, Independent, Mirror and Daily Mail all ran multiple news stories covering the blackout as it was planned, implemented, and the consequences seen. The BBC covered the story on many of its national and local radio stations, as well as on key TV programs. Every other major UK media organisation ran at least one story on the topic. Thanks and congratulations are due to the key people that helped respond to this overwhelming coverage, particularly David Gerard, Jon Davies, Steve Virgin and Jimmy Wales.

Two other Wikimedia UK stories in the last few months of this year have been Monmouthpedia and QRPedia, with both projects seeing worldwide media coverage.

Other memorable topics that the media covered this year included:

  • Cancer Research UK training
  • Wikipedia and global injunctions
  • Wikipedia revealing the ending to The Mousetrap
  • Wikipedia wanting more Women contributors
  • PR companies editing Wikipedia
  • Wikimedia UK gaining charity status, and the annual fundraiser
  • Stories about vandalism in various Wikipedia articles

GLAM Activities - Fae[edit | edit source]

From Liam Wyatt.


When I started at the British Museum as their volunteer Wikipedian in Residence in mid-2009 I had high hopes that the London Wikipedia community would get involved and be inspired - little did I know just how inspired they would be! Now, less than three years later, it is fair to say that Wikimedia UK has caught "GLAM fever" and has a portfolio full of successfully completed as well as ongoing projects. It is no insult to the other members of the global Wikimedia community to say that the UK is is arguably the most active and successful of the Wikimedia Chapters in GLAM-Wikimedia partnerships.

Over the last year, the UK has been innovating in a number of ways. The QRPedia system, developed initially for Derby Museum, has now been integrated into the permanent display labels of a number of international museums and has received international press and industry attention for being the "probably the coolest QR thingy ever made".[1] The British Library's call for a Wikipedian in Residence is the first time that competitive public funding has been successfully obtained for Wikipedia work, helping to demonstrate the great public value Wikimedia projects bring. In another world-first, MonmouthpediA is proof that councils can seamlessly integrate their programs for preserving physical heritage, improving online presence, promoting tourism and providing public access to technology for their towns and cities. Furthermore, these major projects have not distracted from running regular editing and behind-the-scenes tour events up and down the country which help develop Wikimedia community cohesion and build awareness of the GLAM sector, the Chapter and Wikimedia generally.

In the coming one-to-three year period I look forward to Wikimedia UK building on their solid foundation in a number of ways. I would like to see: more successful pilot projects turned in to long-term relationships; the professionalisation of Chapter volunteer support services to help build capacity; projects aimed specifically at the non-English languages and regions of the UK; and partnerships with national heritage groups.

Education and Expert outreach - Martin Poulter[edit | edit source]

See below under P9

Fundraiser - Chris Keating[edit | edit source]

We raised some money

Stevie to create text from:


https://docs.google.com/document/d/1reOr-ZOZYFMtsEm5oIR4UG5ftHc27k5Ze6t7hfMNphE/edit

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AlqyXSQdAbSvdFpPZ2lhVFVvX3A2aEhZOXJuTGpveVE#gid=0

Annual accounts - Andrew Turvey, Richard Symonds. Jon Davies, UHY[edit | edit source]

Draft text for final report - 28 March 2012[edit | edit source]

Draft copy for the report below. A couple of bits to add in but it's making good progress. Please edit as appropriate with comments on the chat page. It's just the copy we're looking at, particularly to make sure I haven't made any dreadful faux pas in any of my descriptions. Design elements will be looked at by the designer and everyone will have a chance to feed into this but suggestions definitely welcome and suggestions can feed in to the designer's thinking. I'd like to get the copy over to the designer by the end of this week please if at all possible to allow for an iterative design process. Thanks. --Stevie Benton (talk) 13:58, 28 March 2012 (UTC)

Front cover[edit | edit source]

(Suggested title) Shaping, sharing, growing: Wikimedia UK annual report 2011-12

(To include a high resolution image of the Wye Bridge (I think you mean Monnow Bridge RB)

P2 - Contents[edit | edit source]

Message from Roger Bamkin, Chair – 3
Message from Jon Davies, Chief Executive – 3
2011-2012 by the numbers – 4
The year in fundraising – 5
The day Wikipedia went dark (the blackout) – 6
Our key media stories – 7
Wikimedia gets GLAM – Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums – 8
Building a legacy – working in education – 9
MonmouthpediA: A case study in innovation – 10
Wikimedia Foundation evaluation summary – 11


Report created by the volunteers, trustees and staff of Wikimedia UK.
Design by Jayne Martin-Kay – www.jemkaye.com
Printed by XXXXXXXXX on 100% recycled paper.

Images: All images used in this report are used under Creative Commons licenses. The credits are as follows with Wikipedia usernames in brackets: Front cover (Monnow Bridge): Robert Crowther, Best Creative. 3: Photo of Roger Bamkin from Mike Peel (www.MikePeel.net), Photo of Jon Davies from his own personal collection. 11: Photo of Ting Chen from Lane Hartwell - Other credits to follow

Wikimedia UK is the operating name of Wiki UK Limited, a Company Limited by Guarantee registered in England and Wales, Registered No. 6741827. Registered Charity No. 1144513. Visit www.wikimedia.org.uk for more information or email info@wikimedia.org.uk


Chair: Roger Bamkin

Chief Executive: Jon Davies

Board of Trustees: Michael Peel (Secretary), Andrew Turvey (Treasurer), Chris Keating, Martin Poulter, Ashley Van Haeften, Steve Virgin

P3 - Introduction[edit | edit source]

A message from Roger Bamkin, Chair

As Brandon says: "This is the first line of my obituary". Eighteen months ago I decided to "come out" and attend a Wikipedian event at the British Museum organised by the board and Liam Wyatt. This was the first time I met many people who were to become leading members of the movement and my friends. Last April I was the UK's second Wikipedian in residence, we had launched QRpedia and I'd been elected chair of Wikimedia UK. All we had to do was become a registered charity, convince a sceptical movement that we could run a £1million fundraiser, find staff and an office and continue to create new and exciting events. What chance was there that we would achieve all that?

Here you will find an annual report that fifty employees who had battled all year could be proud of. I'm thrilled to see the comments from Ting and Liam that underline the success we as volunteers have had. However the effort is unsustainable without professional support and we now have four employees who can help us take our mission further.

Wikimedia has enabled me to meet some wonderful people and QRpedia has put me into contact with enthusiasts around the world. I remember telling you that "we had a billion pound product and we are going places". I think we still have that product and we have moved down the road towards our goal. I was particularly pleased that Monmouthpedia showed that we can still innovate and have Wikimedia led projects. I have had the honour to serve an amazing charity and to work with some wonderful people. Thank you.



A message from Jon Davies, Chief Executive

“This has been an amazing 12 months for Wikimedia UK and I am so pleased to have played a small part in it. To become your Chief Executive was quite an experience in itself. Although I had been editing pages in a modest way I really didn't have a sense of how much went on behind the pages but after five interviews, including a sort of 'X-Factor' visit to the London Wikimeet, all had become clear.

“We now have a UK base with staff, coffee and, most crucially, space for visitors and volunteers. Our building is accessible 24/7 and we have already held several great volunteer events. We have a core staff of four – Richard Symonds, Daria Cybulska, Stevie Benton and myself. Each of us are there to help the community and deliver our very ambitious programme of events and activities. I hope all of us will be familiar faces soon and that we can take some of the administrative burden off the shoulders of the volunteers who have done such an amazing job.

“This annual report looks back at the achievements of the past twelve months but also forward to what we hope to achieve. Much credit must be given to the trustees and volunteers who made so much happen so quickly! 2012 will be a year for Volunteers, trustees and staff together. I can't wait to write next year's report.”


Suggested pull quote for design purposes: “Much credit must be given to the trustees and volunteers who made so much happen so quickly!”

P4 - 2011-2012 by the numbers[edit | edit source]

Key numbers for the Annual Report:

Wiki meets: 25

Members at end of 2010-11: 165 Members at end of 2011-12: 332

Membership increase this year: 167

World website ranking (unique visitors): 5 Unique visitors per month: around 480 million

Number of staff recruited this year: 4

Number of board members: 7

Key moments from the year:

Workshop with Cancer Research UK – March 2011

Derby Museum Backstage Pass and Wright Challenge events – March 2011

WikiConference UK 2011 – April 2011

Wikipedians at Imperial College, the first UK Wikipedia student society, hosts the London Wikipedia Academy – April 2011

Wikimedia Outreach Ambassador recruited at University of Bristol – June 2011

Our Office Administrator, begins work – September 2011

Our Chief Executive arrives in post – October 2011

Wikimedia UK officially recognised as a UK charity – November 2011

Our annual fundraiser begins – November 2011Our new office in the Old Street area of London opens – November 2011

Our first UK Hackathon takes place in Brighton – November 2011

Our annual fundraiser ends, having attracted record donation levels – December 2011

Work officially begins on our Monmouthpedia project – January 2012

Wikipedia goes dark in protest at the proposed SOPA and PIPA legislation – January 2012

P5 - The year in fundraising[edit | edit source]

(Suggested pull quote for design purposes: “The tremendous generosity of donors makes our work possible and everyone involved would like to say a huge, heartfelt 'thank you'.”)

The tremendous generosity of donors, project users and the general public meant that our annual fundraiser attracted over £1 million in donations for the first time. It's this generosity that makes Wikimedia's work possible and everyone involved would like to say a huge, heartfelt thank you. This represents an astonishing 81% increase on the 2010 fundraiser and we received over 42,000 individual donations during November and December 2011 during the fundraiser.

Donations total aside, this was a year of other significant fundraising firsts, too. Thanks to our new status as a registered charity, we were able to claim Gift Aid on UK donations for the first time, leading to around a further £88,000 at no extra cost to donors. Around 60% of donations were Gift-Aided.

We also utilised direct debit as a fundraising method for the first time, which provides us with a regular, predictable income. In fact, nearly a third of the donations we received were via this method, helping us to remain on a steady financial footing for years to come.

Another first saw individuals writing to us and promising to leave a legacy benefiting Wikimedia UK in their wills. These touching acts were both generous and inspiring.

Most people are familiar with our annual fundraising message from our founder, Jimmy Wales, but his year other messages were also shared from a dozen men and women who create and edit content on Wikipedia. As well as helping to raise money for our work they reinforced the point that, no matter who we are, there are writers and editors just like us. This fact may help account for the fact that our membership grew by 165 during the year.

The banner appeal didn't take place in isolation but was significantly supported by other activity. This included sending email messages to previous donors and a limited amount of direct mail. We also switched to more urgent messages towards the end of the appeal, which led to a further spike in donations.

The lessons we've learned from the 2011-2012 fundraiser should prove very valuable. For example, one surprising discovery was that images on leafy, green backgrounds appeared to raise more money than the cut-out pictures that had previously been standard. Once again, we're very grateful to everyone who has donated their time, effort and funds to keep our projects operational.


Suggest we include another image on this page too – designer to advise.

P6 - The day Wikipedia went dark[edit | edit source]

(proposed image the blackout screenshot- pullquote: “We want the internet to remain free and open, everywhere, for everyone.”)

On 18 January 2012 the English language Wikipedia was blacked out in protest against two proposed pieces of US legislation – the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the PROTECT IP Act (PIPA). The protest gained widespread mainstream media coverage with almost every news media highlighting the story in one way or another. The reasons for the blackout are best described in this article by Steve Virgin, a Wikimedia UK Trustee, which first appeared in the New Statesman magazine on 17 January 2012.

“Over the last few weeks, the Wikipedia community has been discussing proposed actions that the community might take with relation to proposed legislation in the United States called Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in the House of Representatives, and the PROTECT IP Act (PIPA) in the U.S. Senate.

“If passed, these would seriously damage the free and open Internet, including Wikipedia. With more than 2,000 Wikipedians commenting on this legislation from all over the world, and a clear majority in favour of taking action, this was the first time the English Wikipedia has ever staged a public protest of this nature, and it’s a decision that wasn’t lightly made.

“It was felt that both SOPA and PIPA are pieces of clumsily drafted legislation that are dangerous for the internet and freedom of speech. It provides powers to regulatory authorities to force internet companies to block foreign sites offering ‘pirated’ material that violates U.S. copyright laws. If implemented, ad networks could be required to stop online ads and search engines would be barred from directly linking to websites ‘found’ to be in breach of copyright.

“However, leaving to one side the fact that there are more than enough adequate remedies for policing copyright violations under existing laws, in most jurisdictions, these draft bills go too far and in the framing SOPA and PIPA totally undermine the notion of due process in law and place the burden of proof on the distributor of content in the case of any dispute over copyright ownership.

“Therefore, any legitimate issues that copyright holders may have get drowned out by poorly-framed draconian powers to block, bar, or shut down sites as requested by industry bodies or their legal representatives. Copyright holders have legitimate issues, but there are ways of approaching the issue that don’t involve censorship.

“Wikipedia depends on a legal infrastructure that makes it possible for us to operate. This needs other sites to be able to host user-contributed material; all Wikipedia then does is to frame the information in context and make sense of it for its millions of users.

“Knowledge freely shared has to be published somewhere for anyone to find and use it. Where it can be censored without due process, it hurts the speaker, the public, and Wikipedia. Where you can only speak if you have sufficient resources to fight legal challenges, or, if your views are pre-approved by someone who does, will mean that the same narrow set of ideas already popular will continue to be all anyone has meaningful access to.

“All around the world, we’re seeing the development of legislation intended to fight online piracy, and regulate the Internet in other ways, that hurt online freedoms. Our concern extends beyond SOPA and PIPA: they are just part of the problem. We want the Internet to remain free and open, everywhere, for everyone.”

Partly as a result of the protest, SOPA and PIPA have been indefinitely postponed.

P7 - Media highlights[edit | edit source]

(A selection of screenshots from news coverage have beentaken to share with the designer. Suggested pullquote: “Our work with Cancer Research UK is an excellent example of the media promoting the need for experts to contribute”)

Even aside from the Wikipedia blackout, 2011-2012 was a year in which Wikimedia UK and Wikipedia were never far from the headlines. Some of the media highlights are pictured on this page. Prominent topics that we've covered elsewhere include our charitable status and the annual fundraiser but there's been plenty more to talk about.

An area that drew particular attention was the naming on Wikipedia of some people who were the subject of so-called super-injunctions. While the information was removed as it didn't come from reliable sources, it lead to significant debates on the nature of privacy and libel laws. Outlets such as the BBC, The Guardian, the Daily Mail and The Independent.

Our work with Cancer Research UK is an excellent example of the media promoting the need for experts to contribute to editing and creating content that has a large appeal. After noting that Wikipedia pages appear higher in search rankings for cancer information than their own website, the charity is encouraging cancer experts to get involved in Wikimedia projects to ensure that people affected by cancer have easy access to the best information. The story was picked up by the BBC, The Times and New Scientist.

Elsewhere, the efforts we've been making to attract new contributors and editors from different backgrounds has been acknowledged, with outlets such as Mac World and The Guardian running the story.

The coverage we've received hasn't always been unequivocally positive. There have been reports of PR companies editing Wikipedia pages to show clients in the best possible light, going against the principle of neutrality of tone. This lead to exchanges of strong opinions in the media, including The Telegraph, the Financial Times, The independent and many more websites and print publications.

Another recurring hot topic was vandalism. Notable instances this year that drew some criticism in the press included mischievous edits to the page of a Rugby World Cup referee, and the falsely reported deaths of actor Rowan Atkinson. It was interesting to see that the journalists did not rejoice on the day that Wikipedia went black, but speculated how they would be able to work without Wikipedia.

Some of the stories that we can predict will be high profile in the coming year include Wiki Loves Monuments, GLAM:Wiki 2012 and MonmouthpediA, more details of which follow later in this report.

P8 - Wikimedia gets GLAM – Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums[edit | edit source]

Galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) hold a vast amount of all human knowledge. Wikimedia UK's mission is to preserve and make knowledge available and it is vital we engage with GLAM organizations and communities to share their information online, and find new ways of doing this effectively.

2011-2012 saw a massive growth in our GLAM programme. Lead by trustee Fae, our network of GLAM enthusiasts including users Pigsonthewing, Brian McNeil, Tom Morris, Leutha, Johnbod and Rock drum (amongst others) have contributed a great deal of work in this field and write regular updates for our community.

At the British Museum, Fae has moved our partnership forward with the digital and curator teams to support several editathons and gained commitment for a Wikipedian in Residence position. The National Archives have started a programme of digitization and release on Wikimedia Commons of World War II artworks and The Land has established our partnership with the National Maritime Museum for releasing data on ships to support Wikipedia article accuracy and expansion.

Derby Museum was the first GLAM institution to partner with us to install QR codes for their exhibits, an initiative driven by Roger Bamkin. Visitors can access Wikipedia articles live on their smartphones and the initiative went on to inspire the Monmouthpedia project. Wikimedians worked with the museum to develop The Wright Challenge, which produced over 1,200 articles in 28 languages relating to the museum's collections.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum in Coventry is Wikimedia UK's longest-running GLAM partnership outside of London. Several local Wikimedians have worked together with the museum to arrange edit-a-thons and meet-ups, facilitate image donations and encourage improvement of related content on Wikimedia projects.

Liam Wyatt was a volunteer Wikipedian in Residence at the British Museum in 2010.

"When I started at the British Museum as their volunteer Wikipedian in Residence I had high hopes that the London Wikipedia community would get involved and be inspired. Little did I know just how inspired they would be!

"Now, less than three years later, it is fair to say that Wikimedia UK has caught "GLAM fever" and has a portfolio full of ongoing and successfully completed projects. It is no insult to the other members of the global Wikimedia community to say that the UK is arguably the most active and successful of the Wikimedia Chapters in GLAM-Wikimedia partnerships.

"The British Library's call for a Wikipedian in Residence is the first time that competitive public funding has been successfully obtained for Wikipedia work, helping to demonstrate the great public value Wikimedia projects bring. In another world-first, Monmouthpedia is proof that councils can seamlessly integrate their programs for preserving physical heritage, improving online presence, promoting tourism and providing public access to technology for their towns and cities.

"Furthermore, these major projects have not distracted from running regular editing and behind-the-scenes tour events up and down the country which help develop Wikimedia community cohesion and build awareness of the GLAM sector, the Chapter and Wikimedia generally.

"In the coming one-to-three year period I look forward to Wikimedia UK building on their solid foundation in a number of ways."

P9 - Building a legacy: Our work in education[edit | edit source]

Contributing to Wikimedia projects, such as Wikipedia, Wikiversity and Wikibooks, is an educational opportunity in the fullest sense, developing sophisticated collaboration, scholarly writing and critical thinking skills at the same time as subject knowledge. Improving an article can be a demanding project in both formal and informal education, for a talented student or a whole class.

We are working with some of the country's most respected and innovative institutions to explore how Wikimedia projects can benefit UK education. In partnership with universities and support bodies, we are gradually establishing Wikimedia as part of the landscape of higher and secondary education. Some examples of this work are below.

Campus Ambassadors

June 2011 saw the first ever Campus Ambassador training event in the UK, taking place at Imperial College, London. Alex Stinson, a Campus Ambassador from the United States, worked with trainees based at Imperial, University of Bristol, and University of Cambridge.

Wikimedia Outreach Ambassador

The University of Bristol continued its close relationship with Wikimedia UK, hosting events including two sessions about Wikipedia for the local Girl Geek Dinners group. Over the summer, it supported a unique paid internship to explore co-working between Wikimedia UK and a university. Sam Knight, a physics student, met with various groups to discuss how Wikimedia UK can promote innovative education, and inform the public about research. As Outreach Ambassador, he brought our work to the attention of many new contacts inside and outside the University.

Student outreach

Wikipedians at Imperial College, the country's first Wikipedia student society, is here to stay, with a new president and new partnerships with other student societies. In October, we ran our first ever stall at a university Fresher's Fair, at the University of Warwick. The Wikimedia UK web site now has advice, support and suggested activities for any students wanting to set up their own Wikipedia society.

Free Speech project

Wikimedia UK, along with Wikipedians at Imperial College, provided training to a group of postgraduates at the University of Oxford, who are improving Wikipedia articles on free speech, across multiple languages, as part of the Free Speech Debate project led by Prof. Timothy Garton Ash.

Campus Wikilounges

Wikimedia volunteers provided "Wikilounge" events in University of Manchester and University of Liverpool, giving free, in-person help for students and staff in making informed use of Wikipedia.

Science Learning Centres

Our work with the UK Association of Science & Discovery Centres includes a keynote at their Marketing Managers Conference and a half-day workshop at Science Learning Centre South West.

Part of the national landscape

Wikimedia UK is working with national advisory bodies to make sure that relevant information about the Wikimedia projects is available to teaching staff, support staff and educational developers. This included co-authoring, with the JISC Centre for Educational Technology and Interoperability Standards, a guide to Wikimedia Commons as a platform for Open Educational Resources.

Bringing in the experts[edit | edit source]

In the past year, we have run training events with members of the Medical Research Council, the Institute of Physics, the Geological Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the conservation charity Wildscreen. Through meetings, presentations and conferences, we have started relationships with other scholarly bodies which will result in events in the coming year. We contributed a feature article to the September issue of Physics World, urging physicists to get involved in Wikipedia. The new "expert outreach" section of our web site shows scientists and scholars how the Wikimedia projects can raise public interest in their research. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Some suggestions for content here would be most welcome. I'll then work on writing the copy. (EDIT: copy is above but notes from myself and User:HJ Mitchell kept for reference purposes. The copy has come from Education_projects --Stevie Benton (talk) 11:34, 4 April 2012 (UTC)

  • Girl Geeks events in Manchester and Bristol, partnerships and wikilounges with the Universities of Manchester and Liverpool, workshops with various scientific bodies. Probably more; these are just the events I know of from the top of my head. Harry Mitchell | Penny for your thoughts? 16:05, 28 March 2012 (UTC)
I've done a re-write. Feel free to trim if there's too much text. The expert outreach bit needn't be on this page as it isn't really an education topic. MartinPoulter (talk) 12:30, 10 April 2012 (UTC)

P10 - MonmouthpediA: A case study in innovation[edit | edit source]

Much of the content here will come from the press site: http://monmouthpedia.wordpress.com and to also include a mention of Derby Museum (this is referenced by Ting Chen in his summary)


P11 - Evaluation summary from Ting Chen, Chair, Wikimedia Foundation[edit | edit source]

(Image to be photo of Ting Chen, saved. Suggested pullquote: “The UK chapter is one of the most promising shooting stars of the last year.”)

Dear Wikimedia UK,

Last September you invited me to visit your board meeting in Derby. It was very insightful for me to see which topics you are working on, how you are working on them, and the interactions within your board and between your board and your visitors. Both I and the Wikimedia Foundation are very grateful for your invitation, your hospitality and your openness.

We talked about a lot of important issues there. Some of them, like the charity status, you have already achieved within the year. Other topics, like the planning and development of the chapter, are going well and progressing. I am especially happy to see that you have successfully got your first employees, which is changing the chapter into a more professionally organised company.

I remember the session where you planned for the future, the potential, all the things you can do, the volunteers you can organise. For me it is one of the most impressive sessions I ever attended on a chapter's board meeting, because it reminds me again why we have chapters, why chapters are important for the Foundation: they organise volunteers, provide help, gather ideas and do really cool things. And one of the most cool things I ever saw is the QR codes in the meeting venue, the Derby Museum. It is innovative, it is useful and helpful, and it is a really magnificent thing.

For me chapters are brothers and sisters. And the UK chapter is one of the most promising shooting stars of the last year. Disputes among brothers and sisters can be the most painful disputes. We had a lot to dispute in the last year, and we will continue these disputes in this year, and maybe also in the coming years. But nevertheless we are brothers and sisters, we share the same vision, in our deepest belief, we also share the same goal. And this is why we need to keep talking with each other, in good faith to each other's motivation, and try hard to understand each other's points of view.

I want to once again congratulate you for your achievements, and thank you for the wonderful things you did in the past year, and look forward to see what you will do in the coming years.

With love and honest respect,

Ting Chen

P12 - back cover[edit | edit source]

P12 is the back cover and will feature our contact details and the Wikimedia UK logo. Also the vision statement.